Saturday, February 28, 2015

2015 books, #11-15

A wanted man, by Lee Child [audiobook]. Read by Jeff Harding. Whitley Bay: Soundings, 2012.

Lee Child and Jeff Harding are pretty much the dream team as far as I'm concerned; but this is also a really gripping book.  Reacher, still with the injuries incurred in The Affair, is hitching a lift to Virginia, hoping to meet the FBI agent he'd connected with during those events.  After a long time, he's picked up by three strangers, ostensibly work colleagues on a marketing trip.  But are they? And why have they picked up Reacher, whose facial injuries make him look even more dodgy than usual?  Something is wrong, and by the time Reacher works out what it is, he's in it up to his neck.  Classic Lee Child; not a word wasted (certainly not by Reacher, who characteristically "says nothing" many, many times) and gripping to the end.

LA confidentiel: les secrets de Lance Armstrong / Pierre Ballester et David Walsh. [Paris]: Editions de la Martinière, 2004.

This one took a while - my French cycling/drugs vocabulary needed a bit of brushing up - but definitely worth a read. Written in 2004, this book was the first journalistic exploration of Lance Armstrong's use of EPO and other banned substances, and interviews a selection of people including Frankie Andreu, Greg LeMond, and several other less famous cyclists whose careers were ended either by the side-effects of banned drugs, or the refusal to take them.  Several interviews with Armstrong himself are included.  Walsh has written since on this subject, but the fact that this book accelerated the investigation into Armstrong and the US Postal team makes it a powerful document.

I'll catch you, by Jesse Kellermann [audiobook]. Read by Adam Sims. Oxford: Isis, 2012.

The world's best-selling thriller writer, William de Vallée, disappears from his luxury yacht; his friend and fellow writer Arthur Pfefferkorn decides to pick up where Bill left off, and steals his manuscript (and leading man, Dick Stapp, a Reacher/Mitch Rapp hybrid).  Pfefferkorn has no idea where this theft will lead him, and descends into more and more farcical adventures in East and West Zlavia, including several escapes, a brace of resurrected dictators and a lot of unlikely facial hair.  This is an extremely funny parody of the hard-boiled spy novel, with the knowledge of thrillers picked up both from Kellermann's own previous novels but also those of his parents Faye and Jonathan; Lee Child meets Tom Sharpe in a picaresque adventure.

Village of secrets: defying the Nazis in Vichy France, by Caroline Moorehead. London: Chatto and Windus, 2014.

I heard an interview with Moorehead on the BBC History podcast and was intrigued by this book, which tells the story of the people of the Plateau Vivarais-Lignon and particularly the town of Chambon, who sheltered hundreds of Jewish children during the Vichy period and helped thousands more Jewish people to escape to Spain, Italy and Switzerland.  Moorehead was intrigued both by the story of these ordinary people who, inspired by their Protestant faith, set out to protect vulnerable Jews, and who subsequently went unacknowledged for many years. It's a fast-paced, moving account of individuals in a terrible time; and while there has been a lot of argument in recent years as to the degree of collaboration and resistance which went on, the basic goodness of people who had very little themselves in quietly defying the authorities shines through.

At death's window, by Jim Kelly. London: Severn House, 2014.

A family out on a sand-bank discover the tethered body of a man; meanwhile burglaries with a political dimension have been happening to second homes all around the area.  Initially, the murder looks like the act of gangs of rival samphire pickers, but Peter Shaw and George Valentine aren't so sure.  Then a second body is discovered, and everything becomes, if anything, less clear.  As ever, this is set on the North Norfolk coast; while this is a well-written, intriguing thriller with a genuinely good twist in the tail, Kelly's ability to describe the villages and skies of the coast is alone worth reading this book for.




Friday, February 13, 2015

2015 books, #6-10

A willing victim, by Laura Wilson [audiobook]. Read by Séan Barrett. Oxford: Isis, 2012.

In 1956, DI Ted Stratton is investigating the death of Jeremy Lloyd in London; his enquiries take him to the countryside, to the Foundation for Spiritual Understanding founded by a Mr Roth.  There, he's bewildered by a cast of rather strange characters, including an immaculately-conceived child, Michael.  When a woman's body is found in nearby woods, Stratton presumes that it's Michael's mother, but events become steadily stranger.  Well written and with a twist in the tail.

A blind eye, by GM Ford [audiobook]. Read by Jeff Harding. Whitley Bay: Chivers/BBC, 2006.

Frank Corso and Meg Dougherty are ostensibly heading out for a photography shoot for Corso's latest true crime book; it isn't until a little later that Corso reveals he's skipping town to avoid a grand jury subpoena.  They're caught in a blizzard driving between airports, and shelter in a semi-derelict house; when they tear up some floorboards to make a fire, they find the bodies of a family. Minus the wife, who turns out to have a string of aliases.  Corso teams up with the local sheriff (an attractive woman) to investigate.  Tightly plotted, a lot of humour, and you can't go wrong with a Jeff Harding reading...

Fathomless riches, or, How I went from pop to pulpit, by the Rev Richard Coles. London: Weidenfeld and Nicholson, 2014.

This was a lovely book; despite many of the events depicted in it!  Richard Coles has written this autobiography and confession telling about the absurdities of 1980s pop-stardom (doing Red Wedge gigs between tours of unimaginable excess), the horror of living in the generation decimated by AIDS, the years between where he was lost and drifting, and his religious reawakening and eventual ordination.  He brings wit and extreme honesty to his story, and describes his religious experience with a combination of matter-of-factness, incredulity and joy with which I could really empathise.  And it sounds like him speaking, which isn't the case with all autobiographies.

The cruellest month, by Louise Penny [audiobook]. Read by Adam Sims. Oxford: Isis, 2007.

It's Easter; but the egg-hunt isn't the only thing going on in Three Pines. Someone's attempting a resurrection of another kind, holding a séance at the old Hadley House, scene of previous crimes; and the result is another death, a woman apparently frightened to death. Armand Gamache is called in again with his team, but they have more than one worry. Someone is out to discredit and disgrace Gamache; someone very close to him.  Another wonderfully written book by Louise Penny, with some excellent three-dimensional characters...

Etape: the untold story of the Tour de France's defining stages, by Richard Moore. London: HarperSport, 2014.

Moore has explored the Tour de France by selecting classic, representational or quite frankly bonkers stages over the last 40 years; and, with only one exception (that of Marco Pantani) interviewed the main players.  This book features interviews with Chris Boardman, Mark Cavendish, Bernard Hinault, Greg LeMond, Eddy Merckx, David Millar and, controversially, Lance Armstrong (who, as we now know, never won anything at all...)  It gives a flavour of the biggest bike race in the world from the point of view of riders, trainers, coaches and administrators, and does it all wonderfully entertainingly.  You get the stage, but you also learn about the background, what made this stage so important, and the repercussions; and you're also constantly reminded about the dark, doping days in cycling's history.

Of which, more in the next set of reviews...

Sunday, February 01, 2015

Poem for St Brigid

I'm not sure this is still a Thing; but I realised today that it was St Brigid's day. And I said a prayer for the Brigids/Bridgets I know, and celebrated that it's Candlemas Eve and we may be able to see our way out of the dark from here.  This was helped by a final Christmas celebration, eating and exchanging presents with a friend.

I was given a complete Robert Frost for Christmas 2013; this poem seems to sum up the fragility so many of us feel at this time of year

Peril of hope, by Robert Frost.

It is right in there
Betwixt and between
The orchard bare
And the orchard green,

When the boughs are right
In a flowery burst
Of pink and white,
That we fear the worst.

For there's not a clime
But at any cost
Will take that time
For a night of frost.


Saturday, January 24, 2015

2015 books, #1-5

Cop town, by Karin Slaughter [audiobook]. Read by Lorelei King. Oxford: Isis, 2014.

Kate Murphy, a Vietnam War widow, decides she can't just sit around waiting for her Country Club parents to pick up her bills, and joins the police in Atlanta in 1974.  She pairs up with Maggie Lawson, who has a brother and an uncle in the police service, and becomes embroiled in a situation which involves Ken Lawson's partner and his family... Good reading, as ever, by Lorelei King; slightly overwrought writing, as ever, by Karin Slaugher; entertaining, and well-plotted.  The sexual and racial politics of 1970s policing in the US South are particularly interesting points...

A restless evil, by Ann Granger [audiobook]. Read by Judith Boyd. [Rearsby, Leics.]: WF Howes, 2002.

A Mitchell and Markby book. While looking for a house as a pre-condition to marriage, Meredith stumbles across a corpse in the local church. And as it turns out, the house was also involved in a disappearance and murder in the past. A nicely judged book with a twist in the tail...


Blessed are those who thirst, by Anne Holt. London: Corvus, 2013.

Hanne Wilhelmsen is sent out, repeatedly, to Saturday night massacres; vast quantities of blood, with a mystery number at the centre. Meanwhile, she's investigating a particularly nasty rape. As Hanne gradually becomes aware that the cases are connected, more random facts threaten to throw her off track; and the victims are also taking action. This is more of a novella at just over 200 pages, but holds the attention...

Foxglove summer, by Ben Aaronovitch. London: Gollancz, 2014.

Fifth in the Peter Grant series. Grant's sent well out of his comfort zone into the Cotswolds to investigate the disappearance of two children. He's brought his wellies.  This is an excellent follow-up to the other books in this series; particularly liked the lack of country stereotyping. Not sure it drives what seems to be the main plot arc all that far, but it's very good reading for all that.

The good, the bad and the furry: life with the world's most melancholy cat and other whiskery friends, by Tom Cox. London: Sphere, 2014.

The next in the series of these entertaining, hilarious books.  If you've ever been under the delusion you've owned a cat, or recognised that a cat owns you, it's a lovely, quick, diverting book, with a cast of characters including Tom's Dad, who speaks entirely in capitals and advises everyone to look out for FOOKWITS AND LOONIES; and, of course, The Bear, a 19-year-old philosopher and mystic disguised as a small black cat.

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

2014 books, #96-100

Dead cold, by Louise Penny [audiobook]. Read by Adam Sims. Oxford: Isis, 2006.

The rather dreadful CeCe, an incomer who has made no effort to make friends in Three Pines, is fatally electrocuted at the annual Boxing Day curling match.  Armand Gamache returns to the village to discover a history of secrets and enemies, and a connection in the dead woman's past to Three Pines.  This is the second of the Gamache books, and many of the same characters as before reappear; while I guessed the murderer early on, there were many twists and turns which led me to doubt my judgment.  A good one to listen to at this time of year, and an excellent reading by Adam Sims.

Fury, by G M Ford [audiobook]. Read by Jeff Harding. Whitley Bay: Chivers, 2004.

Frank Corso is a pariah—a journalist once vilified for making up "facts" on a major crime story. Yet slow, sheltered Leanne Samples trusts no one but Corso to tell the world that her courtroom testimony that put Walter Leroy "Trashman" Himes on Death Row was a lie. Convicted of the savage slaying of eight Seattle women, Himes is only six days from execution, unless Frank Corso and outcast photographer Meg Dougherty into a struggle that goes far beyond right, wrong, truth, and justice. Because the lowly and the powerful alike all want Himes dead at any cost—despite startling new evidence that threatens to devastate a city once again.

The gods of guilt, by Michael Connelly. London: Orion, 2014.

Micky Haller unexpectedly gets a call to a murder case; and then discovers he's about to defend a man accused of the murder of  Glory Days, a prostitute he'd known several years before as a client and friend. As his investigations continue, Micky realises he may have been responsible for what happened to Glory, and acts principally through a sense of guilt.  Another excellent thriller by Connelly, with a tiny cameo appearance by Harry Bosch.

The affair, by Lee Child [audiobook]. Read by Jeff Harding. Whitley Bay: Soundings, 2011.

Finally, this one's the account of how Jack Reacher left the army.  A woman has had her throat cut in a bar in Carter Crossing, Mississippi.  Reacher, still an Army major, is sent undercover to investigate; and meets the local sheriff, a stunningly beautiful ex-Marine.  As the case progresses, Reacher realises that if he does what the Army wants, he may not be able to live with himself, or the Army with him.  An excellent book, and as ever with a great deal of humour mixed in...

The taxidermist's daughter, by Kate Mosse. London: Orion, 2014.

A book group book; this time sent by the publisher which was terribly nice of them!  Sussex, 1912: and in the churchyard, a group of men gather on St Mark's Eve (April 24). Sinister birds fly out of the church, but a more sinister act is taking place while the men are distracted. Constantia Gifford, the taxidermist's daughter, is about to discover a body.  This is a very sinister tale of murder, revenge and dark deeds.  There are a couple of holes in the plot you could drive a coach and horses through, but it can't be faulted for atmosphere and giving a shiver down the spine...

2014 books, #91-95

Bones never lie, by Kathy Reichs. London: Random House, 2014.

Tempe Brennan can't work out why she's being called unexpectedly down from Québec to her other job in South Carolina, only to meet a detective from Québec.  There's a link; a killer Tempe pursued in Canada has appeared in South Carolina and seems to be killing again.  While Tempe is somewhat freaked out by the idea of the killer pursuing her, all isn't the way it seems, and the story twists and turns before its final ending.  I've not been very sure about the last couple of these books, but this one is definitely better than those...

The wrath of angels, by John Connolly [audiobook]. Read by Jeff Harding. Oxford: Isis, 2012.

A Charlie Parker book; I can never decide how much I enjoy these, because the supernatural is mixed into the plot so thoroughly that you can never tell what's real and what's unreal.  In this one, a plane is found in the deep woods in Maine, containing a list of names.  One group wants to keep the names secret; the other wants to use them as a weapon against the sinister Collector.  Meanwhile, there's a beautiful but damaged woman accompanied by a young boy, who is someone Charlie has already killed...

Do no harm: stories of life, death and brain surgery, by Henry Marsh [audiobook]. Read by Jim Barclay. Rearsby, Leics.: WF Howes, 2014.

This is fascinating; an autobiography divided into chapters according to brain disease, with reminiscences of past cases and what those have told Marsh about himself and his own character. There are a lot of fairly gory details here, but also a lot of interesting human stories about the patients and their families; and Marsh's exasperation with the bureaucracy of the NHS comes over loud and clear...

Gods behaving badly, by Marie Phillips. London: Jonathan Cape, 2007.

After Alice invites her friend Neil to the recording of a spiritualist, Apollo, at the TV studios she cleans, she's given the sack.  When she goes looking for private cleaning jobs, she runs into Apollo again; and his relatives Artemis, Aphrodite, Ares...   The ancient Greek gods are living in a filthy Victorian house in London, and at the end of their powers; even sex has lost its power to divert.  This is an extremely funny book by one of the creators of Warhorses of letters.

Death at La Fenice, by Donna Leon [audiobook]. Read by Richard Morant. [S.l.]: BBC Audiobooks, 2003.

The first of the Brunetti novels.  Maestro Helmut Wellnauer is killed by cyanide in his dressing room during the interval of the opera he is conducting. Wellnauer has an interestingly complicated private life, and also many professional rivalries, so Brunetti has a large and colourful cast of suspects to interview.  I guessed what had happened well before the end, but the setting and writing are good enough that this didn't matter.


Saturday, November 22, 2014

NaBloPoMo day 22: Naming of parts

The daily blogging being completely blown, at least I can show you what I've been doing with another of this month's tasks - the NaKniSweMo cardigan.

I have pieces.  All the pieces, in fact...

burrard_22nov

From top to bottom, two sleeves, two fronts and a back.  The colour's actually a pale cool grey, but this is how it looks on the chair by the PC in the lamplight...

Having these sorted by the 22nd is great; but I'd really like to get the bands picked up and finished tomorrow, because it's too big to carry to work and back...

That's 76,692 stitches, at my best calculation...


Tuesday, November 18, 2014

NaBloPoMo day 18: In memoriam, again

It's a month of slightly grim anniversaries, it seems... Was walking past one of the memorials at King's Cross this morning, which was cordoned off, and remembered it was the anniversary of the King's Cross fire in 1987.  I was at college at the time, and friends were visiting London; thankfully, they'd left before the fire started, but we stayed up for a long time listening to the radio...

In all, 31 people lost their lives underground at King's Cross that day, passengers, LUL staff and first responders among them. 100 others were injured, many of them seriously.



In some ways it feels like another era despite only being 27 years ago.  Wooden escalators, for one thing. People smoking on the Tube for another. Smoking on the underground sections of the Tube had been banned for two years, and on the trains themselves for three; but smoking in the ticket halls immediately next to the escalators was still permitted and the escalators themselves were a bit of a grey area. The investigators concluded that the fire had been caused by a match falling through the side of the escalator and onto a build-up of litter and grease below; as well as by a completely new phenomenon in fire research, a flashover later termed the trench effect.

The King's Cross disaster helped to increase the safety of public transport; smoking was banned throughout the network three days after the fire; the escalators took just a little longer (the last wooden escalator was removed from Greenford station on 10 March 2014).

There are two memorials at King's Cross; the first went up in the 1990s.  Later, a clock appeared above it with the upper plaque which says This clock has been given in memory of those who lost their lives in the fire at King's Cross station on 18th November 1987.  From all the underground staff at sub-surface & tube stations.


The later memorial (also in the ticket hall, in the corridor which leads to St Pancras) gives the names.  All the names.  One victim stayed unidentified for 17 years after the fire and, after much searching including a forensic reconstruction and tracking down of the origin of a metal stent in his skull, identified as a 73-year-old homeless man from Falkirk; I'm always moved when I look at the plaque that time was also taken to carve his name in afterwards.


I'm often irked at King's Cross - at the moment, there's a hugely convoluted contraflow because the escalators replaced after the fire are being replaced again, and access to the central line is often controlled at peak times. Walking past both memorials every day should remind me of what happens when health and safety fails, and often it does.

I haven't given up completely on NaBloPoMo, but it does seem to have fallen somewhat by the wayside! Will post as I can...